Most of Facebook users are deeply concerned on how social networking site decides what to show them in news feeds.

News feed engineer Lars Backstrom explains, “every time someone visits News Feed there are on average 1,500 potential stories from friends, people they follow and Pages for them to see, and most people don’t have enough time to see them all.” That figure comes from an internal study of 7,000 active users over one week in July 2013.

Basically, your likes and comments serve the key components underlying the most recent update, and why you’re seeing the status updates you see at any given point in time. Similarly Facebook algorithm also takes into account the stories you hide and take it as the type of stories you are not interested in anymore.

“Our ranking isn’t perfect, but in our tests, when we stop ranking and instead show posts in chronological order, the number of stories people read and the likes and comments they make decrease,” Backstrom wrote.

fb-1Facebook’s primary goal is to keep the users interested in the site which is indicated by the number of comments and likes from the users. It also offers sparkling statistics to share with advertisers and brands.

“Previously, people read 57% of the stories in their News Feeds, on average,” Backstrom wrote. “They did not scroll far enough to see the other 43%. When the unread stories were resurfaced, the fraction of stories read increased to 70%.”

Facebook is clearly adopting ways to keep people on the site for longer and the recent update in News feed algorithm is one of them. But the big win today isn’t the new feature; it’s the social network to be brave enough to explain users what’s the agenda behind it.

 

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Most of Facebook users are deeply concerned on how social networking site decides what to show them in news feeds. News feed engineer Lars Backstrom explains, “every time someone visits News Feed there are on average 1,500 potential stories from friends, people they follow and Pages for them to see,...
Most of Facebook users are deeply concerned on how social networking site decides what to show them in news feeds. News feed engineer <a href="https://www.facebook.com/lars">Lars Backstrom</a> explains, “every time someone visits News Feed there are on average 1,500 potential stories from friends, people they follow and Pages for them to see, and most people don’t have enough time to see them all.” That figure comes from an internal study of 7,000 active users over one week in July 2013. Basically, your likes and comments serve the key components underlying the most recent update, and why you’re seeing the status updates you see at any given point in time. Similarly Facebook algorithm also takes into account the stories you hide and take it as the type of stories you are not interested in anymore. “Our ranking isn’t perfect, but in our tests, when we stop ranking and instead show posts in chronological order, the number of stories people read and the likes and comments they make decrease,” Backstrom wrote. <a href="http://www.grasphub.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/fb-1.jpg"><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-1890" alt="fb-1" src="http://www.grasphub.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/fb-1-300x255.jpg" width="300" height="255" /></a>Facebook’s primary goal is to keep the users interested in the site which is indicated by the number of comments and likes from the users. It also offers sparkling statistics to share with advertisers and brands. “Previously, people read 57% of the stories in their News Feeds, on average,” Backstrom wrote. “They did not scroll far enough to see the other 43%. When the unread stories were resurfaced, the fraction of stories read increased to 70%.” Facebook is clearly adopting ways to keep people on the site for longer and the recent update in News feed algorithm is one of them. But the big win today isn’t the new feature; it’s the social network to be brave enough to explain users what’s the agenda behind it.