Our eye doesn’t work like a camera. It moves rapidly in small amounts and continuously updates the image to “paint” the detail. Also, since we have two eyes, signals from both sides are combined by the brain to increase the resolution further. Due to this, a much higher resolution image than possible with the eye’s abilities, can be generated in the brain. The very fact that we haven’t been able to come up with artificial devices that work the way a human eye does, confirms that we haven’t been completely able to understand this complex device yet.

But what we know about the average human eye is that its ability to distinguish between two points is measured to be around 20 arcsecs. That means, two points need to subtend an angle of at least 0.005 degrees to be distinguished by the human eye. Points lying any closer than that would mean that the eye would see it as a single point.

Apple Science

Retina display, the Apple’s flagship display is said to be so sharp that the human eye is unable to distinguish between pixels at a typical viewing distance. As Steve Jobs said:

It turns out there’s a magic number right around 300 pixels per inch, that when you hold something around to 10 to 12 inches away from your eyes, is the limit of the human retina to differentiate the pixels. Given a large enough viewing distance, all displays eventually become retina.

Basically, Apple has done science at home and has come out with a nice number, 300 PPI. Practically, you don’t need anything higher than that. Technically, you do.

Noone is really sure whether More is better.

Recent phones from Samsung, HTC, Nokia and Sony are providing 316, 332 and 440 ppi. Practically i would say we dont need these much ppi’s, they should put an end to this and use the same money in some other research.

Do Retina Displays Make Sense Muzammil Hassan Apple
Our eye doesn’t work like a camera. It moves rapidly in small amounts and continuously updates the image to “paint” the detail. Also, since we have two eyes, signals from both sides are combined by the brain to increase the resolution further. Due to this, a much higher resolution image than possible...
Our eye doesn’t work like a camera. It moves rapidly in small amounts and continuously updates the image to “paint” the detail. Also, since we have two eyes, signals from both sides are combined by the brain to increase the resolution further. Due to this, a much higher resolution image than possible with the eye’s abilities, can be generated in the brain. The very fact that we haven’t been able to come up with artificial devices that work the way a human eye does, confirms that we haven’t been completely able to understand this complex device yet. But what we know about the average human eye is that its ability to distinguish between two points is measured to be around <a href="http://clarkvision.com/imagedetail/eye-resolution.html">20 arcsecs</a>. That means, two points need to subtend an angle of at least 0.005 degrees to be distinguished by the human eye. Points lying any closer than that would mean that the eye would see it as a single point. <strong><span style="font-size: 1.17em;line-height: 1.5em">Apple Science</span></strong> Retina display, the <a href="http://WWW.APPLE.COM">Apple’s </a>flagship display is said to be so sharp that the human eye is unable to distinguish between pixels at a typical viewing distance. As Steve Jobs said: <blockquote>It turns out there’s a magic number right around 300 pixels per inch, that when you hold something around to 10 to 12 inches away from your eyes, is the limit of the human retina to differentiate the pixels. Given a large enough viewing distance, all displays eventually become retina.</blockquote> Basically, Apple has done science at home and has come out with a nice number, 300 PPI. Practically, you don’t need anything higher than that. Technically, you do. Noone is really sure whether More is better. Recent phones from Samsung, HTC, Nokia and Sony are providing 316, 332 and 440 ppi. Practically i would say we dont need these much ppi's, they should put an end to this and use the same money in some other research.